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Erin Perry
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These are watercolour sketches from the travel journal I kept on our trip to La Manzanilla in the state of Jalisco, Mexico in 2005. A charming sidewalk restaurant where we enjoyed breakfast one morning – mmm - fresh tortillas, chimichanga and big mugs of steaming cafe con leche.

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We spent long lazy days in the sun, naps in the hammock, endless time to read, journal and paint. Our base was a house halfway up a hill (steep climb!) with a constant 180 degree view of the bay below. The house was built right up against the hillside and surrounded by lush foliage and myriads of palms.

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Two iguanas lived on the carport roof and kept a watch on the outdoor shower. But... ..not near as close a watch as I kept on them!

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The last few days of our trip were spent in El Manzanillo in the state of Colima, 30 miles down the coastline. A charming little hotel, right on the shore. Beautiful rooms, spectacular sunsets, and long walks along the Pacific.

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This bridge arched over the swimming pool. It was delightful to relax on the patio, listening to the rustle of the palms with a margarita in hand and watch the lights of the city across the curve of the shore.


These were done with medium line Faber Castell Pitt Artist pens and Windsor and Newton watercolours. I love, that inexpert as I am, the sketches really capture the essence and feel of when and where they're created and can transport me right back there -ah! is that a whiff of coffee I smell?
Gill Tomlinson
Having been ill for several weeks, I feel like I've missed out on the start of the summer here in Greece. So made a big effort yesterday and headed off to the beach with a new(ish) moleskin sketchbook, water pen, a handfull of pens and some brand new Caran D'Ache Neocolour crayons.



As this was the crayons' first outing, I hadn't accounted for the fact that they are not for outdoor use here (in a Greek summer!) Think - bar of chocolate in 38 degree heat....not a pretty sight. No longer pristine, they have now re-formed at least, thanks to some freezer blocks that were keeping a watermelon cold.



Anyway - despite getting in a bit of a mess, I managed to exercise both crayons and moleskin and produce a couple of sketches from under the umbrella!

Fran Meneley
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Wow! What a great find I stumbled upon yesterday at my favorite local (and very fabulous) art paper store - www.twohandspaperie.com. Scissors disguised as a pen! How brilliant is that? I have surrendered more than one pair to airport security personnel, literally across the globe, because I've left them in my travel journal kit in my carry on. TSA frowns upon them. But you can take knitting needles on an air plane. Really? But I digress.

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These fold up like a pen and then, voila they are scissors sharp enough for collage fodder and comfortable to hold. Brilliant design. I believe it's a German company that makes them, so may be readily available in Europe at stationery stores. A quick Google search revealed they can be ordered from www.jetpens.com - my favorite Japanese pen company.

Love them and had to share.
Erin Perry
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One of the most interesting journals I've ever done was created on a bunch of mat board samples that I bought for $2.00 when our local hobby store was going out of business. They were held together with a screw and fanned out so you you see the different shades.

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I used it on a trip to Canada for a Nick Bantock workshop and a trip to Port Townsend, Washington the following week for Art Fest. It was a bit challenging to adapt to the narrow, long shape, but lots of fun!
Jeanette Sclar
When you travel somewhere outside your own country, the coinage is such a beautiful and mysterious part of the trip! I always save samples, putting them into the pockets of a plastic sheet meant to hold slides.

I used waxed thread to tie a knot in the top of each pocket, so the coins would not fall out, and bound the plastic sleeve into my journal. You could also attach it with rivets, sew it in, use clips - whatever suits your style!small-IMG_1355.jpg
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